Good news for heavy vehicle on Eton Range

June 12, 2017 Tara

A successful heavy vehicle trial on Eton Range over the weekend has resulted in good news for local heavy vehicle operators.

A trial was undertaken by Transport and Main Roads and NQ Group Heavy Haulage Australia to explore possible changes to heavy vehicle restrictions currently in place on Eton Range due to damage from Cyclone Debbie.

Minister for Main Roads and Road Safety Mark Bailey said the success of the trial had allowed the restrictions to be revised to allow 35 metre long combination vehicles to travel unloaded across Eton Range.

“My department is working closely with industry stakeholders to identify ways of accommodating restricted vehicles, and minimise impacts to heavy vehicle operators,” Mr Bailey said.

“Due to damage from Cyclone Debbie, only vehicles 30 metres or less have been able to travel on Eton Range.

“Larger vehicles travelling between Mackay and Nebo have been required to use a detour via the Bruce Highway, Bowen Developmental Road, Collinsville Elphinstone Road and Suttor Developmental Road.”

Member for Mirani Jim Pearce said following the success of the trial over the weekend, 35 metre long combination vehicles could now travel unloaded across Eton Range.

“Allowing these vehicles to return via the Peak Downs Highway across Eton Range will significantly decrease return travel time and improve efficiencies for the transport industry,” he said.

“Repair works are continuing on Eton Range and are expected to be completed by August this year, weather permitting.”

Eligible reconstruction works will be jointly funded by the Commonwealth and Queensland Government under the Natural Disaster Relief and Recovery

For full details on the width and mass restrictions, heavy vehicles operators are encouraged to check the Transport and Main Roads Conditions of Operation Database before each trip.

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